Jhurjhura Fund

We are committed to responsible citizenship, in particular to the areas that inspire us and our creations.  Each and every piece we create and sell also gives back.

Our clothing designs (not sewn by a Cheeky Monkey directly) are sewn by Kuku Arora.  Kuku runs a school for 150 street children with the money he earns from his tailoring business.  You can see his story at  http://www.sunshineproject-delhi.org

We are committed to responsible citizenship, in particular to the areas that inspire us and our creations.  Each and every piece we create and sell also gives back.

Our clothing designs (not sewn by a Cheeky Monkey directly) are sewn by Kuku Arora.  Kuku runs a school for 150 street children with the money he earns from his tailoring business.  You can see his story at  http://www.sunshineproject-delhi.org

5% of profits from all other sales go to the Jhurjhura Fund.  At the end of the year the money raised is donated to grass-roots efforts surrounding forests, wildlife and tiger conservation in India.   The decision about where the money goes will be made after visiting with groups working on the ground.

2013, profits were donated to take village school children on safari into their parks, to increase their appreciation for this incredible environment. An otherwise prohibitively expensive excursion for them.  In 2012, monies raised from photographic books were donated to a village school in Madla by Panna National Park.

Check our website in July 2014 to see what the money you helped raise is doing next.

Who is Jhurjhura?  In April 19, 2010, I had the privilege of photographing the beautiful Jhurjhura tigress and her barely 4-month-old cubs, as they cooled off in the Jhurjhura Pond in Bhandhavgarh National Park, India.

The cubs were fierce little creatures, snarling up at us, when they remembered to as they played around the small water hole.  The Jhurjhura tigress was a wonderful mother, who, I heard later, had never lost a cub.  Successfully raising many of these magnificent and complex creatures.

Barely one month later, she was struck repeatedly by a jeep, in the park illegally after dark and died early the next day.  Her cubs, far too young to survive, were relocated to a protected area in the park, but died, one-by-one.

To make this particularly horrendous, no-one has been charged with this murder, even though apparently the responsible party is known.  Justice may never be given for these animals, but perhaps some good can come from the Fund in her name.

A recent and successful effort was spearheaded by a wonderful friend and English artist – Jennifer Buxton – along with Bhavna, who owns and runs Ken River Lodge, along with her husband, near Panna Tiger Reserve.  Hoping to create the feedback of money from tourism to bordering the parks, they started a local school in Madla village that now teaches over 150 local village boys and girls.

 

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